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  • Death of Roman Emperor Valentinian II, May 15, 392.

    Valentinian II, born Valentinianus in 371, reigned as a Roman emperor in the Western Empire from 375 until his death in 392. Raised to power at the age of 4, his reign was marked by political turmoil and religious debates, culminating in his mysterious death. Early Life Valentinian, born in 371, was the son of Emperor Valentinian I and his second wife Justina. His half-brother, Gratian, had been sharing imperial authority with their father since 367. Following Valentinian I’s death on

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Byzantine Emperor Leo VI died on May 11, 912.

    Leo VI, also known as “Leo the Wise”, was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 886 to 912. Early Life & Rise to Power Leo, officially recognized as the son and heir of Basil I (867-886), was widely speculated to be the son of Michael III (842-867). This stemmed from the fact that Leo’s mother, Eudokia Ingerina, had previously been Michael’s mistress. Basil had another son, Constantine, who was his eldest and preferred successor, but his untimely death in 879 under mysterious circu

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Spanish Writer Miguel de Cervantes passed away on April 22, 1616.

    Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (29 September 1547 (assumed) – 22 April 1616) was an Early Modern Spanish writer widely regarded as the greatest writer in the Spanish language. He is best known for his novel Don Quixote, a work considered to be the first modern novel. Early Life Despite his later fame, much of Cervantes’ early life remains shrouded in uncertainty, including details about his name, background, and physical appearance. It is generally believed that he was born around 29 Se

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Battle of Manila Bay, May 1, 1898.

    The Battle of Manila, also known as the Battle of Cavite, occurred on May 1, 1898, in Manila Bay, Philippines. It was the first significant battle of the Spanish-American War and one of the most decisive naval battles in history, marking the end of the Spanish colonial period in Philippine history. The Spanish-American War The Spanish-American War had its origins in the rebellion against Spanish rule that began in Cuba in 1895. The repressive measures that Spain took to suppress the gu

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Henry VIII becomes King of England, April 21, 1509.

    Henry VIII (1491-1547) reigned from 1509 to 1547. Known for his six marriages, break from the Catholic Church, and establishment of the Church of England, his reign was marked by political and religious upheaval. Early Life In August 1485, Henry Tudor's victory over Richard III marked the end of the Wars of the Roses. Crowned as Henry VII, he established a new dynasty, the Tudors, solidified by his marriage to Elizabeth of York in 1486. This union symbolized the reconciliation of warri

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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