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  • Marie Antoinette marries Louis XVI, May 16 1770

    On this day in 1770, Marie Antoinette (1755-1793) and Louis XVI (1754-1793) got married in the Palace of Versailles. The marriage was arranged by Empress Maria Theresa of Habsburg and King Louis XV to strengthen the Franco-Austrian alliance against Prussia and Great Britain. Background After the Seven Years’ War, Empress Maria Theresa of Austria decided to put an end to hostilities with France and seek an alliance between both territories. Both she and Louis XV of France wished to sto

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    “New Rome” was established by Constantine the Great, May 11 330 AD

    On this day in 330 AD, Roman Emperor Constantine I the Great established New Rome, also known as Constantinople (now Istanbul), as the capital of the Roman Empire. Constantine rebuilt the city on a massive scale following the model of Rome and transformed it into the most important city of the empire. The beginning of New Rome New Rome was built as an extension of the city of Byzantium, a settlement founded by Megarian colonists back in 657 BCE which was located in the Bosporus strait.

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The King James Version of the Bible was published, May 2 1611

    On this day in 1611 the King James Version, also known as the Authorized Version or King James Bible, was published under the patronage of King James I of England and VI of Scotland (1566-1625). The text, which is an English translation of the Bible, had an enormous influence on English literature and was used as the reference sacred text until the twentieth century.  How the King James Bible came to be Even though James’ predecessor Queen Elizabeth I had succeeded in reinstating Prote

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Joan of Arc relieves the city of Orleans, April 29 1429

    On this day in 1429, French heroine Joan of Arc (1412-1431), also known as Joan the Maiden or the Maid of Orléans, relieved the city of Orleans, which was occupied by the English. Joan played a major role during the Lancastrian phase of the Hundred Years’ War by leading the French forces in several military campaigns. Before the siege When Joan was only thirteen years old she started having visions of Saint Michel, Saint Margaret and Saint Catherine. These visions continued throughout

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Death of Queen Christina of Sweden, April 19 1689

    On this day in 1689, Queen Christina of Sweden (1626-1689) passed away at the age of 62. Christina ruled from 1632 until her abdication in 1654 and is known as one of the most important intellectual figures of the 17th century. Early Years Christina was the only surviving child of King Gustav II Adolf and Maria Eleonora of Brandenburg. Following her father’s wishes, she was educated as a prince and was well-versed in religion, philosophy, Greek and Latin. She also spoke seven languages

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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