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  • Henry VIII becomes King of England, April 21, 1509.

    Henry VIII (1491-1547) reigned from 1509 to 1547. Known for his six marriages, break from the Catholic Church, and establishment of the Church of England, his reign was marked by political and religious upheaval. Early Life In August 1485, Henry Tudor's victory over Richard III marked the end of the Wars of the Roses. Crowned as Henry VII, he established a new dynasty, the Tudors, solidified by his marriage to Elizabeth of York in 1486. This union symbolized the reconciliation of warri

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Titanic embarks on its maiden voyage, April 10, 1912.

    The RMS Titanic, an ocean liner of the White Star Line, tragically sank on its maiden voyage from Southampton to New York on April 15, 1912, following a collision with an iceberg. The disaster claimed the lives of over 1,500 individuals with only 705 survivors. The Titanic The Royal Mail Ship Titanic, part of the Olympic-Class liners along with RMS Olympic and RMS Britannic, was launched from the Harland and Wolff shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland on May 31, 1911. Constructed wit

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Promulgation of the Charter Oath, April 6, 1868.

    The Charter Oath of 1868 stands as a foundational document in Japan’s modern history, symbolising a pivotal moment of transformation and renewal. Through this oath, Japan embarked on a journey towards modernization, marking the beginning of the Meiji era. Background The Charter was published during a tumultuous period of Japan’s history, known as the Meiji Restoration. Since 1192, the country had been governed by a military government known as the shogunate, with the shōgun as the head

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Cleopatra reinstated as Queen of Egypt, on March 27, 47 BC.

    On this day in 47 BC, Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator (born 70/69 BC—died August 30 BC, Alexandria) regained her position as co-ruler of Egypt alongside her brother Ptolemy XIV, with the support of Julius Caesar. Early Life & Succession Cleopatra VII Philopator, born in 69 BC, initially shared rulership with her father, Ptolemy XII Auletes. When she was 18 years old, her father died, leaving her the throne. However, because Egyptian tradition held that a woman needed a male consort t

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Roman Poet Ovid was born on March 20, 43 BC.

    Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC – 17/18 March 17 AD), commonly known as Ovid, was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He is regarded as one of the most important poets in Latin literature, alongside Virgil and Horace. Early Life Ovid was born into a prestigious equestrian family on March 20, 43 BC, in Sulmo, a town nestled in the Abruzzo province east of Rome, during a period of political turmoil. The collapse of the Roman Republic ushered in a turbulent era, mar

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    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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