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  • The French Revolution of 1848 started on February 22, 1848.

    The French Revolution of 1848 marked a phase of social and political turmoil that resulted in the downfall of the July Monarchy and the establishment of the French Second Republic. Background At the beginning of the 19th century, Louis XVIII governed France as part of a constitutional monarchy. After his death in 1824, his brother, the Count of Artois, assumed the throne as Charles X. Uninterested in a constitutional monarchy, he took steps to bolster his authority by curtailing press

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Roman Emperor Jovian died on February 17, 364.

    Jovian, the Roman Emperor from June 363 to February 364, ascended to the throne following the death of Julian the Apostate. Early Life & Ascension to the Throne Jovian, born on June 27, 331, in Singidunum, Moesia Superior (modern-day Belgrade, Serbia), was the son of Varronianus, the commander of Constantius II's imperial bodyguards. Joining the guards, he played a significant role in 361, escorting Constantius' remains to the Church of the Holy Apostles. That same year Jovia

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Battle of Thapsus, February 6, 46 BC.

    At the Battle of Thapsus, which took place on February 6, 46 BC near Thapsus in modern Tunisia, Julius Caesar’s army delivered the final blow against supporters of Pompey the Great. Background In 49 BC, the Roman Republic plunged into its final civil war as Julius Caesar defied senatorial orders to disband his army following the Gaul campaign and advanced towards Rome. The Optimates, lacking an organised army, sought refuge in Greece under Pompey’s leadership but were eventually defeat

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Livia Drusilla was born on January 30, 58 BC.

    Livia Drusilla (58 BC-AD 29) was the third wife of Emperor Augustus, the mother of Emperor Tiberius, and the grandmother of Emperor Claudius. She stands as one of the remarkable women who rose to prominence while residing in the shadow of a powerful leader. Early Life & Marriage Though much of Livia’s early life remains shrouded in mystery, a common thing for women of her era, she is believed to have been born on January 30, 58 or 59 BC, most likely in Rome. Before her marriage to

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Charlemagne, ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, died on January 28, 814.

    Charlemagne, also known as Charles the Great or Charles I (742-814), was King of the Franks from 768 to 814, King of the Franks and Lombards from 774 to 814, and Holy Roman Emperor from 800 to 814. Renowned for his military achievements that brought together a significant portion of Western Europe, he remains a prominent figure from the Early Middle Ages. Early Life & Rise to Power Charlemagne’s birthplace was likely Aachen, in present-day Germany, during the final years of the Mer

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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