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  • Isabella II of Spain was proclaimed queen, September 29, 1833.

    Isabella II (10 October 1830 – 9 April 1904) was Queen of Spain from 1833 until her deposition in 1868. Being the only queen regnant in the history of unified Spain, her reign was marked by tumultuous events and political upheavals. Early Life: The First Carlist War Isabella II was born to King Ferdinand VII of Spain and Queen Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies, during a period of political turmoil. The aftermath of the French Revolution and Napoleon's invasion of the Iberian Peninsul

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, died on September 21, 1558.

    Charles V (24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was Holy Roman Emperor and Archduke of Austria from 1519 to 1556, King of Spain from 1516 to 1556, and Lord of the Netherlands from 1506 to 1555. His dominions earned him the title of ruling over the first "empire on which the sun never sets." Early Life & Rise to Power Charles V was born into the Habsburg dynasty, a family that controlled vast territories in Europe. His father, Philip the Handsome, was the Duke of Burgundy, and his

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Cry of Dolores, September 16, 1810.

    The Cry of Dolores, delivered by Catholic priest Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla in Dolores on 16 September 1810, is a call to arms that triggered the Mexican War of Independence. Every year on the eve of Independence Day, the President of Mexico re-enacts the cry from the balcony of the National Palace in Mexico City. Background The late 18th and early 19th centuries were turbulent times in Latin America, marked by the oppressive rule of colonial powers. In Mexico, a Spanish colony for nea

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Elizabeth I was born, September 7 1533.

    Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death in 1603. She was the last monarch of the House of Tudor and is known as the "Virgin Queen". Early Life & Rise to Power Born on September 7, 1533, Elizabeth was the daughter of King Henry VIII and his second wife, Anne Boleyn. However, her birth was a source of disappointment for her parents, who had anticipated a male heir. Before Elizabeth turned three, her mother

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Treaty of Nanking, August 29 1842

    The Treaty of Nanking was a peace treaty that put the First Opium War to an end (1839-1842). It was signed between Great Britain and the Qing Dynasty of China and is considered by the Chinese as the first of the Unequal Treaties. The First Opium War During the 18th and early 19th centuries, the British Empire's demand for Chinese goods, particularly tea, porcelain, and silk, resulted in a significant trade imbalance. The British paid for these goods with silver, draining their reserve

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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