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  • The Battle of Vitoria, June 21, 1813.

    On June 21, 1813, at the Battle of Vitoria, the British, Portuguese, and Spanish forces decisively defeated the French forces commanded by King Joseph Bonaparte and Marshal Jean-Baptiste Jourdan near Vitoria, Spain. This victory paved the way for the Allies’ triumph in the Peninsular War. The Peninsular War The Peninsular War began in 1808, following Napoleon’s invasion of Spain and Portugal. Initially an ally of France, Spain became a battleground when Napoleon deposed the Spanish Bou

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Hundred Days’ Reform, June 11, 1898.

    The Hundred Days’ Reform, also known as the Wuxu Reform, was a short-lived national, cultural, political, and educational reform movement that lasted for 103 days, from June 11 to September 22, 1898, during the late Qing dynasty. Background In 1895, while Liang Qichao and his mentor Kang Youwei were travelling to Beijing to take the imperial exams, their ship, despite being in Chinese territorial waters, was boarded and searched by a Japanese vessel—Japan had recently delivered a deci

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    King George V of the United Kingdom was born on June 3, 1865.

    George V (3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 1910 until 1936. Early Life & Accession to the Throne George was born on June 3, 1865, in London, as the second son of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, and Alexandra, Princess of Wales. His father was Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s eldest son, while his mother was the eldest daughter of King Christian IX and Queen Louise of Denmark. Initially, George had

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Empress Joséphine of France died on May 29, 1814.

    Joséphine de Beauharnais (1763-1814) was the first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821). She served as Empress of the French from May 18, 1804, until their marriage was annulled on January 10, 1810. Additionally, she was the Queen of Italy from March 1805 until 1810. Early Life & First Marriage Marie Josèphe Rose Tascher de La Pagerie, better known as Joséphine de Beauharnais, was born on June 23, 1763, on the Caribbean island of Martinique. Her family arrived on the island in 17

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Passing of the Edict of Worms, May 26, 1521.

    On this day in 1521, the Edict of Worms was issued, banning the writings of Martin Luther, whose efforts to reform the Church sparked the Reformation. The Edict declared him an outlaw and a heretic, calling for his capture. Luther’s 95 Theses Martin Luther began questioning the Church’s doctrines around 1513, arguing that many Church mandates were unbiblical. Initially, his objections centred on the sale of indulgences, which were writs purchased to remit sins for the living or the dea

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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