Jump to content
  • The Battle of Pharsalus, August 9 48 BC

    The Battle of Pharsalus was fought between Julius Caesar and Pompey the Great. It took place near Pharsalus in Central Greece on August 9 48 BC and it was a decisive battle of Caesar’s Civil War. It led to Pompey suffering a great defeat and fleeing his camp and men.  Background After having conquered the Gallic tribes, Julius Caesar's relationship with the Roman Senate was a tense one, as the latter had ordered him to relinquish command of his legions. Caesar knew that obeying the Sen

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Roman Emperor Claudius was born, August 1 10 BC

    Claudius was born on August 1 10 BC in Gaul, which made him the first Roman Emperor to be born outside of Italy. The emperor ruled from AD 41 to 54. During this period, he extended Roman rule in North Africa and made Britain a province. Early Life Claudius, whose original name was Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus, was born in Gaul on the 1st August 10 BC. He was the son of Roman general Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia Minor, daughter of Marc Antony. During his early years, Claudius w

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Treaty of Breda, July 31 1667

    The Peace of Breda, also known as the Treaty of Breda, put an end to the Second Anglo-Dutch War (1665-1667). It was signed on July 31st, 1667, in the Dutch city of Breda by England, the Dutch Republic, France and Norway-Denmark. As a result, the Dutch gave New Netherland to England but still retained their monopoly in world trade. Background The Second Anglo-Dutch War was caused by commercial tensions between England and the Dutch Republic over the control of the seas and trade routes.

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Battle of Alarcos, July 18 1195

    The Battle of Alarcos was a battle between the Almohads, led by caliph Abu Yusuf Ya'qub al-Mansur, and the Castilians, ruled by  Alfonso VIII. It took place on July 18 1195 in Alarcos, Spain, and resulted in the victory of the Almohads and the retreat of the Castilians to Toledo.  Background In 1190, the Almohad caliph Yaqub al-Mansur succeeded in repelling the attacks of the Castilians over the Muslim territories and an armistice was agreed upon. When the truce ended in 1194, King Alf

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Henry VIII marries Catherine Parr, July 12 1543.

    On July 12 1543, King Henry VIII married Catherine Parr (1512-1548) at Hampton Court Palace. Catherine was the last of the six wives of the king and the final queen consort of the House of Tudor. She is also the most-married English queen and the first woman to publish an original work under her name in English in England. How did Henry VIII and Catherine Parr meet? When Catherine’s second husband passed away in 1543, she became a rich widow. She then decided to use her mother’s frien

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
×
×
  • Create New...