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  • The Capture of Rome, September 20 1870

    The Capture of Rome, also known as the Presa di Roma, put an end to the process of the Italian unification, the Risorgimento. This event led to the defeat of the Papal States and the unification of the Italian Peninsula (with the exception of San Marino) under King Victor Emmanuel II of the House of Savoy. It also led to the establishment of Rome as the capital of Italy. Background Back in the Second Italian War of Independence (1859), King Victor Emmanuel II conquered most of the Papa

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Philip III crowned King of Spain and Portugal, September 13 1598

    Philip III (1578-1621), also known as Philip the Pious, was King of Spain. He was also King Philip II of Portugal, Sicily and Naples. During his reign, he relied on his chief minister, the Duke of Lerma, something which earned him much criticism. On the other hand, he was able to achieve temporary peace with the Dutch and brought Spain into the Thirty Years’ War. Ruling the Spanish Empire at its height, Philip’s reign is considered to be a critical period in Spanish history. Early Years and

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Marie Leszczyńska marries Louis XV, September 5 1725

    Marie Leszczyńska was queen consort of King Louis XV of France from 1725 until her death in 1768. She was the longest queen in service in French history, ruling for almost 43 years. Daughter of deposed Polish king Stanislaw I, Marie was a devout Roman Catholic and enjoyed great popularity among the French people. She is responsible for the introduction of many Polish customs to the royal court at Versailles and her dynastic connections led to France eventually annexing Lorraine. Early Nego

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Great Fire of London, September 2 1666

    The Great Fire of London was the worst fire in London’s history. It destroyed a big part of the City of London, including St. Paul’s cathedral and 13,000 houses. After the fire was extinguished, the city was reconstructed following the same medieval street plan which still exists nowadays.  Origin and Development of the Fire The fire started on the night of Sunday, September 2 1666, at the King’s bakery in Pudding Lane. Even though the neighbours tried to stop it, the fire quickly spre

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Battle of Bosworth Field, August 22 1485

    The Battle of Bosworth Field was in effect the last battle of the Wars of the Roses (1455-1487), a series of civil wars fought between the Houses of York and Lancaster over the English crown. The Battle of Bosworth resulted in the victory of Lancastrian contender Henry Tudor over Yorkist king Richard III and established the Tudor dynasty on the throne.  Background After the Battle of Tewkesbury (1471), the House of Lancaster was left with no direct claimants to the throne and Yorkist k

    Beatriz Camino
    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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