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  • The Casket Letters, June 20 1567

    On this day in 1567, the Casket letters were found in a casket in the possession of James Hepburn, 4th Earl of Bothwell. They were eight letters and sonnets said to have been written by Mary, Queen of Scots, to Bothwell in 1567. The letters were used as evidence to prove that the Queen had plotted with Bothwell to murder her husband, Lord Darnley. Political Background A few months after Lord Darnley died in mysterious circumstances, Mary married the Earl of Bothwell, who became the mai

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Battle of the Dunes, June 14 1658

    On this day in 1658, the Battle of the Dunes, also known as the Siege of Dunkirk, took place. The Battle was a siege carried out by France and England to take the city of Dunkirk, Spain's greatest privateer base. The victory led to the surrender of the city by Spain and eventually to the conclusion of the Franco-Spanish war with the Peace of the Pyrenees (1659). Prelude The battle occurred while the French, who were under the command of Vicomte Turenne, carried out a siege of Dunkirk.

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    This Week in History

    The Treaty of Tordesillas, June 7 1494

    On this day in 1494, the kingdoms of Spain and Portugal signed the Treaty of Tordesillas, an agreement that divided the territories of the “New World” into two spheres of influence. The consequences of this agreement can still be appreciated nowadays throughout America. The Leadup to the Treaty The Treaty of Tordesillas was aimed to solve any kind of dispute that might arise between Portugal and Spain regarding the newly discovered territories in the New World. Before the discovery of

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    The Peasants' Revolt, May 30 1381

    On this day in 1381, the introduction of a poll tax led to the outbreak of the Peasants’ Revolt, also known as the Great Rising. It was a largely unsuccessful uprising that took place in late-medieval England. Even though it failed, it served as proof that peasants could be a potential opposition to the monarchy. Causes of the Revolt The Peasants’ Revolt was caused by several factors that led to social unrest. To begin with, the Black Death, a pandemic ocurring in Europe from 1346 to 1

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    Beatriz Camino
    This Week in History

    Queen Victoria of England, May 24 1819

    On this day in 1819 Queen Victoria (1819-1901) was born in Kensington Palace. She was the last monarch of the House of Hanover and ruled for 63 years. Her reign, which is known as the Victorian Era, was a period of great industrial, scientific, social and political development. This era is also considered the gilded age of the British Empire. Early Years and Ascension to the Throne Queen Victoria was born on May 24, 1819. Her father, Prince Edward, the Duke of Kent, was the fourth son

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    This Week in History
  • Roman Coins

    Do you remember how you started collecting coins? Although I started out like many kids, collecting coins from pocket change, I first discovered ancient Roman coins in 1997 when I was 29 years old and on vacation in Italy with my mom and sister. While in Rome, I stopped in Roma Numismatica and was stunned to learn you could own ancient coins. I bought my first Roman coin, an antoninianus of Gordian III with Sol on the reverse, for $44.44. I still have the coin to this day and likely always will.

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Experiments In Greek Minting Technique

    Ancient coins. The following is a scan of the article by D. G. Sellwood in the 1963 edition of The Numismatic Chronicle. The two sample coins and publication were sold on VAuctions in September, 2016: http://www.vauctions.com/ViewArchiveItem.asp?id=32953 Lot 698.  [Miscellaneous]. Lot of two modern trial strikes by David Sellwood using experimental minting techniques. Includes: AR ‘tetradrachm’. Grape bunch / Side view of triple-crested Corinthian helmet right within incuse square // A

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights

    Earliest Coinage

    The practice of using coins as a medium of trade began during the Iron Age in the 7th and 6th Centuries BC, in Greece, Anatolia, India and China. Coins proved to be an efficient vehicle of exchange not only locally, but between different areas, since the coins were small and contained intrinsic value due to their composition of silver and gold. Trade obviously existed for millennia before the practice of stamping an image on a piece of metal, but once the concept of the Lydians began to spread,

    Zach Beasley
    Zach Beasley
    Weekly Highlights
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